Science

Scientists developing machine that translate thoughts into text in real time

The novel technology holds promise for individuals with speech impairments, potentially providing a new way for them to communicate.

Scientists at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a groundbreaking machine that translate thoughts and instantly transcribe them into text. This device demonstrates a high level of accuracy, successfully translating thoughts into written words 79% of the time.

At the core of this innovation is a brain-computer interface (BMI), a technology that connects the brain to electronic devices. The researchers focused on the supramarginal gyrus, a key area for language in the brain, to capture the electrical impulses that occur when we think.

machine that translate thoughts
Source: Business Recorder

How it works

Tiny electrodes are surgically implanted into the brain’s supramarginal gyrus to pick up the brain’s electrical signals when a person thinks of a word. These signals are then interpreted by a computer program that has been trained to recognize patterns associated with specific thoughts.

In trials, participants were given visual or auditory cues and asked to think about a word without speaking. The BMI system was able to identify these thought patterns and convert them into text on the spot, effectively “reading” the participants’ minds with notable accuracy.

Advancements in Neurotechnology: The Development of a Machine That Translate Thoughts

Innovative research at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) leads to the creation of a revolutionary machine capable of interpreting brain signals to translate thoughts into text in real-time.

machine that translate thoughts

Potential and Challenges

This technology holds promise for individuals with speech impairments, potentially providing a new way for them to communicate. Although the current method requires invasive surgery, the team is researching non-invasive techniques for broader application.

Ethical considerations are also being taken into account. Researchers, including Dr. Jerry Tang from the University of Texas, stress the importance of regulations to prevent misuse and ensure the technology is used ethically and with user consent.

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Dr. Shubhangi Jha

Avid reader, infrequent writer, evolving

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